examples of celebrity endorsements

Beastly branding

The owl of hootsuite.com

In my previous post, I talked about brand mascots: when to use them to boost your brand, and when to avoid them.

After the blog post was published, one of my blog readers pointed out that the majority of brand mascots are, in fact, animals.

This prompted me to do a bit more digging into the subject, and here’s what I found: a very interesting paper by Professor Stephen Brown from Ulster Business School: Where the wild brands are: some thoughts on anthropomorphic marketing. (( Brown, Stephen., Marketing Review, Fall 2010, Vol. 10, issue 3, pp. 209-224 ))

The paper gives many examples of companies using animals as brand mascots, and discusses which beasts are most popular.

Ronald McDonald

Throughout history, humankind has had a love-hate relationship with wild animals. On the one hand, we fear and detest powerful predators, especially those that destroy our crops and kill our livestock. On the other hand, we envy and admire their speed and grace, adorn ourselves in their fur and feathers, and worship them as totemic deities who symbolise our tribes, our teams, our territories. (( ibid. ))

In branding, mascots became popular a century ago in France, when almost every company adorned its products with friendly looking cats, dogs and insects. Interestingly, fictional people’s characters have also been used quite successfully in branding. For example, the 116-year old Michelin man is still alive and well-known.

Brown concludes that fictional human characters are most popular brand mascots, followed by birds, domestic animals, and wild animals (so, SCHMOOZY FOX is still doing okay here!). Insects, aquatic creatures, vegetables and body parts (!) have much less popularity, although I would imagine that some friendly insects such as bees and lady birds are okay to use!

The main rule of thumb is that “Brand animal popularity is directly related to the species’ physiological and psychological distance from humankind.” (( ibid. )) The closer the species to the human kind, the easier it is for people to “process” a brand mascot.

In terms of animals, domestic and wild, it’s interesting to see that different countries might attribute different qualities to the same animal. So, study the character of your brand beast well before you go global!

burts_bees

Madonna to launch Material Girl on August 3rd

Snapshot of Macy's site

Hello, fans of funky brands! As you've noticed, SCHMOOZY FOX has been a bit silent over the past couple of weeks. We've been taking a break from computers to enjoy the summer, give ourselves a boost of creativity, and, of course, schmooze!

We're back with awesome news from the US. Tomorrow, Madonna and her daughter Lourdes will be launching a new junior fashion brand, Material Girl.

This brand launch is simply packed with many branding concepts and marketing tools previously discussed on this blog.

First, it's an example of how a personal brand of Madonna has served as a basis for a new product brand.

Second, this a nice example of a smart celebrity endorsement by a 17-year old US teen star Taylor Momsen, whose own edgy and funky style and personality pinpoint the values of Material Girl.

Third, there's an important element for any brand launch -- distribution channel, in this case Macy's -- that has been selected to strengthen Material Girl's positioning as affordable and democratic clothes.

Material Girl has a lot of potential to become a funky brand. We'll be curious to watch its progress after its official launch tomorrow.