dooley

Skip a milkshake, order a smoothie

I've just read an interesting post by Roger Dooley, The Power of Positive Names. In his review of an upcoming study about the power of naming products and product categories (to be published later this year in the Journal of Consumer Research), Dooley gives simple but quite powerful examples.

 

It turns out, we are much more likely to indulge into cakes for breakfast if cakes are called muffins.  In a similar way, we appreciate a dish of pasta, meat and vegetables if it's called pasta salad rather than simply pasta. And yes, a smoothie definitely sounds more healthy than a milkshake, notwithstanding the fact that it's essentially the same product.

 

Big gifts, big rewards

Today I want to share with you an interesting article on the Neuromarketing blog, Give Big, Get Bigger. The article discusses the subject of reciprocity, and it boils down to the following conclusion: if you want to receive something, give first.

A study by a German researcher Armin Falk showed that the bigger the "gift" sent by charitable foundations to potential donors, the bigger the reward that donors give to charities.

 

"Falk’s study involved mailing 10,000 requests for charitable donations, divided into three groups. One group got just the letter requesting the donation, one group received the letter plus a free postcard and envelope (the “small gift”), and the last got a package containing four postcards and envelopes (the “large gift”)....The small gift boosted donation totals by 17%. The recipients of the large gift, though, were even more generous: they donated 75% more than the no-gift group." (quote by Roger Dooley)

 

Reciprocity is often misunderstood by marketers -- for instance, at conferences, or in direct mail. How many times have you receive "gifts" that you didn't need, for example? Reciprocity in business becomes really powerful only when gifts are chosen thoughtfully and consciously, with the final gift recipient in mind.

 

Try to give meaningful gifts, and see if this can help you build a funky brand.