co-branding examples

Another example of co-branding: Veuve Clicquot and DKNY

I've written extensively on co-branding and brand partnerships already, and am always on the lookout of interesting examples in this area. Today, I'd like to share a recent example of a brand partnership between a Champagne brand Veuve Clicquot and a fashion brand DKNY: co-branded boots.

dkny-veuve-clicquot-rubber-boots

The funky product concept and design play an important role in spicing up both brands, and create good publicity in fashion magazines and online.

Note that both Veuve Clicquot and DKNY are part of the LVMH group. It's a smart move on the part of LVMH as it's promoting both of its brands at the same time.  Initiated within such multi-brand groups as LVHM, such co-branding initiatives can be used to revitalize tired brands by creating partnerships with more successful brands from the same portfolio.

Anders Wall, CEO of Biomega, talks about city biking as a new luxury

The MN bike by Biomega

Having talked about square wheels in the previous interview featuring a Swiss watch brand Maurice Lacroix, today our focus is on round wheels -- a Danish brand of bikes called Biomega. Launched in 1998 by an industrial designer Jens Martin Skibsted, Biomega is a company that has been building its brand through a rigorous strategy of brand partnerships. Through co-operation with PUMA and such world-famous designers as Marc Newson, Ross Lovegrove and Karim Rachid, as well with its bikes featuring in permanent collections of art museums, the brand of Biomega has occupied a very interesting niche on the bike market: a stylish, funky and functional luxury item for use in the city. Today I am happy to host Anders Wall, CEO of Biomega who shares his views on city bikes and funky brands.

Anders Wall

SCHMOOZY FOX: Anders, the name Biomega sounds a bit like it could be a brand of healthy food or vitamins. Could you tell me the story behind the brand name?

Anders Wall: Indeed, some people also think that there is something “bio” about it. But in reality, the name was conceived as “bi omega” which visually would look like this ΩΩ. Two letters "omega" put together do look like a bike.  Later on the name took a life of its own, and there’s no such association in customers’ minds.

SCHMOOZY FOX: Did Biomega follow a strategy of brand partnerships and co-operation with famous designers right from the beginning?

Anders Wall: Jens Martin Skibsted, the founder of Biomega, has designed most of the bike models. But indeed, Biomega was set to build its brand through partnerships with such famous designers as Marc Newson early on.

SCHMOOZY FOX: What’s the brand philosophy of Biomega? How are you reinventing the wheel?

The Boston bike

Anders Wall: We think that a bicycle is often portrayed as a product consisting of many spare parts, rather than a complete whole. The “spare part” brand discourse is very typical to most bike brands, and it’s very rare that they address the values and needs of consumers other than technical performance. For Biomega, a bike is based on the concepts of integration, drivability, durability and visibility. By integration, we mean that a bike is one whole that can bring a lot of aesthetic value to the owner. By drivability, we mean that a bike should be easy to drive, fast in acceleration and quick in braking. Durability refers to the fact that our bikes will last. All of these qualities are important to keep in mind when a new model of Biomega bike is conceived and designed. And finally, visibility means that our bikes must make both the product and the user noticeable. Our products stand out in the crowd, and so does the person who's using the bike!

SCHMOOZY FOX: Why do you refer to Biomega bikes as New Luxury?

Anders Wall: Bikes and biking as a process in general is hardly ever associated with luxury. Biomega does add luxury to bikes, primarily through superior design. What’s important is that Biomega bikes are meant to be used only in the city. Through their ease of use and funky design they in fact compete with cars! In this sense, owning an astonishing bike with luxurious design as opposed to having to sit in traffic jams becomes a true luxury.

SCHMOOZY FOX: How much does it cost to own such an object of new luxury?

Anders Wall: The majority of our bikes cost around 1.200-1.500 Euro. Our special models like the MN is more expensive (prices start at around 3.500 Euro). Our most exclusive bike, a carbon version of the MN with special components, is sold at the price at 6.500 Euro. Our bikes are distributed through design stores,  as well as selected bicycle stores.

SCHMOOZY FOX: Besides co-operation with famous designers, Biomega also went into brand partnerships. Could you speak about Biomega’s partnership with Puma?

Anders Wall: We have worked on a brand partnership with Puma for five years now. The brand partnership was based on the Biomega model Boston, which was created in special versions for the Puma brand stores around the world. These Puma versions carried both the Puma and the Biomega logo, and were unique in colors. Last year, our partnership was taken further and we are now a licensee of Puma. In the coming months we will introduce a new range of Puma bicycles – 5 models in total – which have been designed and produced by Biomega. Where the previous bikes were only sold in Puma brand stores, the new range will be sold through bike stores all over the world and online. This is a very exiting new business for both Puma and Biomega.

SCHMOOZY FOX: To what extent do you think Biomega can be called a Funky Brand?

Anders Wall, CEO of Biomega

Anders Wall (smiling): I think that SCHMOOZY FOX’s definition of funky brands is very much in line with Biomega’s philosophy. We are small (there are only 6 employees at Biomega!) but a very agile company. We think we have created a great company culture and built the business through a very rigorous brand strategy right from the start. The funky aspects are certainly seen by the final customer, but only few people realize that behind this there’s a lot of very meticulous business and brand strategy work done within the company! We’re also outward rather than inward-looking, and through our brand partnerships we have achieved a global reach.

SCHMOOZY FOX: Do you bike to the office?

Anders Wall: I live outside of Copenhagen, and actually take a train every day. But once I am in the city, I of course bike! I own several models of Biomega, including the MN model. After all, apart from being a CEO, I am also Biomega’s brand ambassador, and I very much enjoy it!

SCHMOOZY FOX: Thank you, Anders!

Can laptops and nail polish complement each other?

Dell&OPIBrandPartnership2 Today SCHMOOZY FOX is going to talk about brand partnerships.

This is an important topic that should be on the radar screen of young and promising funky brands. If your company is not a completely new start-up, and you have already achieved a good degree of brand awareness of your product or service in your main markets, then consider partnering up with another brand.

Why?

Well, provided you choose your brand partner smartly, this can enhance your own brand positioning, and add some nice new aspects, flavors, emotions and associations to your brand.

Some earlier examples of brand partnerships mentioned on SCHMOOZY FOX, have been the collaboration between Naked Wines & Jamie Oliver, Nike & Dizzee Rascal, as well as a celebrity endorsement of Baileys by Kim Cattrall.

Another example that's worth mentioning is the recent partnership between Dell and a nail polish producer OPI.  At first, this might sound like a strange idea: the product categories are totally different, how can they complement each other?

But Dell went for it, introducing 26 nail polish themed colors to choose from in the Dell-Design studio, a site which allows customization of laptops.

It actually seems quite logical to me why Dell went for this partnership. The main advantage is that Dell now has 26 nice and shiny ways of selling laptops to style and fashion conscious female customers. I would choose these two shades of orange that would  look very funky for SCHMOOZY FOX, what do you think?

Dell&OPIBrandParnership1

Dell&OPIBrandPartnership

The advantages of this partnership seem more obvious for Dell than OPI.

OPI also got something out of this deal, of course: getting your name mentioned on Dell's site must be a fantastic boost to the nail polish producer's brand. It looks like OPI is targeting those female business professionals who want to stay stylish at work – matching your laptop with nail polish probably seems like a cool thing to do.

But will the ladies who have just bought one of those orange Dell Inspiron laptops run to the shop to get a matching shade of OPI, or can they choose another brand's nail polish in the same color? In other words, it's not totally clear whether this partnership will boost the OPI sales in the short term. However, the possibility of long-term positive effect on future sales from raised brand awareness is strong.

So, get those brand partnerships on your radar screen, and have fun giving manicures to laptops. As long as it brings you more happy customers.

If you want to know whether a brand partnership is a good idea for your company, ask olga (at) schmoozyfox (dot) com.