Starbucks

Need rebranding? Don't just change your logo, think brand strategy

Old Apple logoI am often asked to explain what brand strategy stands for. In my experience, many people still associate branding, and brand strategy, with graphic design -- logos, web sites and other elements of visual identity. Whereas visual identity is absolutely essential in branding (and SCHMOOZY FOX works with a great team of designers to take care of it!), it's just one step in a broader activity which is brand strategy.

Brand strategy is your overall business strategy that has an objective of building a  S T R O N G  B R A N D.

This may sound rather simple, but in reality, a good brand strategy is a very complex exercise.  A good brand strategy can determine your success, and no brand strategy is often a recipe for a failure (see my previous blog post Brands do not take care of themselves).

Rebranding is a good chance to sort out your overall brand strategy. Often, companies feel like getting away from a tired image, and creating something more consistent with market needs.  This "something" is often, in their view, a change of look and feel. Often, their rebranding efforts are only about changing a logo.

But the reality is, even after improving their logos, many companies don't sort out their bad customer service, or improve product functionality. It's astonishing that many companies simply do not think that these strategic elements have anything to do with their brand!

Today, I want to share with you a story  published on Inc.com, How to rebrand your business successfully. It summarizes a rebranding project that was done by Seattle's Coffee Company (part of the Starbucks group). See how the company measured the size of their market, did competitor research, re-thought their customer base, and improved distribution channels.

All of these activities are characteristic of brand strategy and should be considered within any rebranding project.

Brand partnerships

Photo by Nelson Cheen on Flickr

Funky brands evolve, they are not static.  In spite of being able to stay true to its authentic values and brand vision, a funky brand is nevertheless able to keep its finger on the pulse of consumers, experiment and surprise them.

BRAND RE-VITALISATION TECHNIQUES

I have already discussed several techniques that brands use in order to stay contemporary and fun.

Line extensions occur when a company “introduces additional items in a given product category under the same brand name, such as new flavours, forms, colours, ingredients or package sizes.” 1.

Example is Starbucks introducing a line of instant coffee, Starbucks Via.

Brand extensions are more radical ways of either capitalizing on the success of your already popular brand, or bringing some fresh air into the otherwise old and tired brand image. A brand extension is “using a successful brand name to launch a new or modified product in a new category.”2

Example: a brand of bananas Chiquita and its new line of fruit juice bars.

BRAND PARTNERSHIPS, OR CO-BRANDING

True to its "schmoozy spirit" (schmoozing is the term I discussed before), SCHMOOZY FOX is fond of brand partnerships.

They can be particularly interesting for you if your brand does not yet plan to launch a whole new product line, or extend into a totally unexplored area.  Then perhaps a brand partnership is something to keep in mind while you are searching for a strategic direction. Brand partnerships are also referred to as co-branding.

A brand partnership is usually a short or medium-term collaboration between two or more brands in order to enhance each other's positioning vis-a-vis the target market.

FASHION AND HOME ACCESSORIES

A recent trend that I've been noticing in the mass luxury (also called new luxury) market is this: fashion brands partner with artists and designers to create home accessories.

Here is a recent example of this trend that I came across in a Dutch magazine (forgot its name :( )

Diesel lamp

This is a lamp that is a result of a brand partnership between Diesel, Foscarini and Moroso.

Another example is a recent partnership between Levis and fashion designer Veronique Branquinho. The suprising result of this partnership is not actually related to fashion at all.   It's .... wall paint that is sold under a slogan Fashion for Walls.

levis_ambiance_1

Watch this space for more examples of brand partnerships.

1) Principles of Marketing, P. Kotler, 2002, p. 478

2) Kotler, Principles of Marketing, 2002, p. 479

Revitalizing tired brands: Chiquita's Fruit Bars

What comes to mind when you think, "Chiquita?" Is this, "bananas?" Lately, Chiquita has extended its brand into fruit bars, based on a franchise model. This short post talks about a Chiquita Fruit Bar spotted in Brussels.

On line extensions and Starbucks Via

Massively criticized, the launch of its first instant coffee by Starbucks might be successful long-term, provided the company chooses its target markets well, and pursues the right pricing strategy in relation to its freshly brewed coffee.