Maurice Lacroix

A new kind of brand ambassadors: famous bloggers

I've written about brand celebrity endorsements in the past. In one of my articles, A new kind of brand ambassadors: famous entrepreneurs, I talked about the growing tendency among brands to form partnerships with famous people other than actors and musicians. A whole new kind of brand ambassadors is emerging. In this article, I talked about a Swiss watch brand Maurice Lacroix choosing Wikipedia’s founder Jimmy Wales as its brand ambassador.

And here’s another interesting example. H&M, a Swedish fashion brand whose strategy revolves around frequent brand partnerships (usually, with famous designers and performers), has launched a fashion collection co-branded with a fashion blogger Elin Kling.

It seems that brands are moving away from associating themselves with famous and glamorous people towards working with those who have a lot of personality.

As we've seen in the story of Ice Watch, its founder  went a step further, hiring an unknown girl from a Dutch village as the face of the brand.  There's surely a tendency emerging in the world of marketing and branding, where companies want to connect to their customers in more genuine ways, moving away from celebrity status towards something more real, and yet convincing and glamorous.

Funky Brand Interviews are one year old!

Photo by Theresa Thompson on Flickr Today, SCHMOOZY FOX's  Funky Brand Interviews are turning one!

Since last June, we've interviewed founders and top managers of some of the funkiest brands out there. In each of these interviews SCHMOOZY FOX has tried to uncover personalities and interests of real people behind brands, as well as learn insights into these innovative companies from a personal perspective of people who work there.

From the Dutch lingerie queen, to a talented photographer who helps people build funky personal brands, to a funky T-shirt brand and a top luxury fashion designer -- all of our interviewees could identify with SCHMOOZY FOX's concept of funky brands. And this is definitely something to celebrate!

Below is the list of all SCHMOOZY FOX's Funky Brand Interviews to date, and there will be more funky ones coming soon!

And don't forget, we'll continue to celebrate throughout the summer! If you are a funky (or funky-to-be) startup, you can learn how you can benefit from some top-notch brand strategy coaching that we've arranged for you FREE of charge! Learn more here.

OUR FUNKY BRAND INTERVIEWS TO DATE

Interview with Rowan Gormley, CEO of Naked Wines

Interview with Marlies Dekkers, the Dutch "lingerie queen"

Interview with artist Thaneeya McArdle

Interview with Kyan Foroughi, CEO of Boticca,com, an online jewellery market place

Interview with James Payne from Baileys Irish Cream

Interview with Tekin Tatar from BeFunky.com

Interview with Wim Somers from Theo

Interview with founders of Lotty Dotty

Interview with Michael Chia, a photographer who helps build funky personal brands

Interview with Martin Bachmann, CEO of Maurice Lacroix watches

Interview with Anders Wall, CEO of Biomega bikes

Interview with fashion designer Tim Van Steenbergen

Anders Wall, CEO of Biomega, talks about city biking as a new luxury

The MN bike by Biomega

Having talked about square wheels in the previous interview featuring a Swiss watch brand Maurice Lacroix, today our focus is on round wheels -- a Danish brand of bikes called Biomega. Launched in 1998 by an industrial designer Jens Martin Skibsted, Biomega is a company that has been building its brand through a rigorous strategy of brand partnerships. Through co-operation with PUMA and such world-famous designers as Marc Newson, Ross Lovegrove and Karim Rachid, as well with its bikes featuring in permanent collections of art museums, the brand of Biomega has occupied a very interesting niche on the bike market: a stylish, funky and functional luxury item for use in the city. Today I am happy to host Anders Wall, CEO of Biomega who shares his views on city bikes and funky brands.

Anders Wall

SCHMOOZY FOX: Anders, the name Biomega sounds a bit like it could be a brand of healthy food or vitamins. Could you tell me the story behind the brand name?

Anders Wall: Indeed, some people also think that there is something “bio” about it. But in reality, the name was conceived as “bi omega” which visually would look like this ΩΩ. Two letters "omega" put together do look like a bike.  Later on the name took a life of its own, and there’s no such association in customers’ minds.

SCHMOOZY FOX: Did Biomega follow a strategy of brand partnerships and co-operation with famous designers right from the beginning?

Anders Wall: Jens Martin Skibsted, the founder of Biomega, has designed most of the bike models. But indeed, Biomega was set to build its brand through partnerships with such famous designers as Marc Newson early on.

SCHMOOZY FOX: What’s the brand philosophy of Biomega? How are you reinventing the wheel?

The Boston bike

Anders Wall: We think that a bicycle is often portrayed as a product consisting of many spare parts, rather than a complete whole. The “spare part” brand discourse is very typical to most bike brands, and it’s very rare that they address the values and needs of consumers other than technical performance. For Biomega, a bike is based on the concepts of integration, drivability, durability and visibility. By integration, we mean that a bike is one whole that can bring a lot of aesthetic value to the owner. By drivability, we mean that a bike should be easy to drive, fast in acceleration and quick in braking. Durability refers to the fact that our bikes will last. All of these qualities are important to keep in mind when a new model of Biomega bike is conceived and designed. And finally, visibility means that our bikes must make both the product and the user noticeable. Our products stand out in the crowd, and so does the person who's using the bike!

SCHMOOZY FOX: Why do you refer to Biomega bikes as New Luxury?

Anders Wall: Bikes and biking as a process in general is hardly ever associated with luxury. Biomega does add luxury to bikes, primarily through superior design. What’s important is that Biomega bikes are meant to be used only in the city. Through their ease of use and funky design they in fact compete with cars! In this sense, owning an astonishing bike with luxurious design as opposed to having to sit in traffic jams becomes a true luxury.

SCHMOOZY FOX: How much does it cost to own such an object of new luxury?

Anders Wall: The majority of our bikes cost around 1.200-1.500 Euro. Our special models like the MN is more expensive (prices start at around 3.500 Euro). Our most exclusive bike, a carbon version of the MN with special components, is sold at the price at 6.500 Euro. Our bikes are distributed through design stores,  as well as selected bicycle stores.

SCHMOOZY FOX: Besides co-operation with famous designers, Biomega also went into brand partnerships. Could you speak about Biomega’s partnership with Puma?

Anders Wall: We have worked on a brand partnership with Puma for five years now. The brand partnership was based on the Biomega model Boston, which was created in special versions for the Puma brand stores around the world. These Puma versions carried both the Puma and the Biomega logo, and were unique in colors. Last year, our partnership was taken further and we are now a licensee of Puma. In the coming months we will introduce a new range of Puma bicycles – 5 models in total – which have been designed and produced by Biomega. Where the previous bikes were only sold in Puma brand stores, the new range will be sold through bike stores all over the world and online. This is a very exiting new business for both Puma and Biomega.

SCHMOOZY FOX: To what extent do you think Biomega can be called a Funky Brand?

Anders Wall, CEO of Biomega

Anders Wall (smiling): I think that SCHMOOZY FOX’s definition of funky brands is very much in line with Biomega’s philosophy. We are small (there are only 6 employees at Biomega!) but a very agile company. We think we have created a great company culture and built the business through a very rigorous brand strategy right from the start. The funky aspects are certainly seen by the final customer, but only few people realize that behind this there’s a lot of very meticulous business and brand strategy work done within the company! We’re also outward rather than inward-looking, and through our brand partnerships we have achieved a global reach.

SCHMOOZY FOX: Do you bike to the office?

Anders Wall: I live outside of Copenhagen, and actually take a train every day. But once I am in the city, I of course bike! I own several models of Biomega, including the MN model. After all, apart from being a CEO, I am also Biomega’s brand ambassador, and I very much enjoy it!

SCHMOOZY FOX: Thank you, Anders!

Maurice Lacroix watches: authenticity, achievement and square wheels

A Maurice Lacroix watch with a square wheel Have you ever thought that wheels can take different shapes than just a circle? According to Wikipedia, a wheel is “a circular device that is capable of rotating on an axle through its centre, facilitating movement or transportation while supporting a load (mass), or performing labour in machines.”

Well, here’s the big news: a Swiss watchmaker Maurice Lacroix has recently revealed a new watch model, Masterpiece Regulateur Roue Carre, which contains a S Q U A R E  W H E E L to display the hours!

Being somewhat of a geek, I found this engineering and design innovation funky enough to trigger my interest in finding out more about the brand. In addition, having already written about Maurice Lacroix’s recent brand endorsement campaign featuring Wikipedia’s founder, Jimmy Wales, I strongly felt that yet another Funky Brand Interview was about to materialize. And here you are, today I am happy to publish my interview with Martin Bachmann, CEO of Maurice Lacroix.

SCHMOOZY FOX: Martin, how would you characterize the brand of Maurice Lacroix in a couple of sentences?

Martin Bachmann: Maurice Lacroix stands for contemporary watchmaking, manufacture excellence and is oriented to authentic consumers with modern lifestyle. SCHMOOZY FOX: And what do you mean by “authentic”?

Martin Bachmann: Authenticity is staying true to one’s values, not being afraid of standing out from the crowd, sometimes following a bit of a different direction from everybody else’s. It’s also about achievement and success.

SCHMOOZY FOX: And is authenticity something that unites the three brand ambassadors who have recently endorsed Maurice Lacroix -- Jimmy Wales, Bob Geldof and Justin Rose?

Martin Bachmann: Yes, authenticity along with achievement and success are the qualities that unite these brand ambassadors who, as you point out, have recently participated in our brand endorsement campaign. We were happy to identify them because they pinpoint the qualities that are also inherent to the brand of Maurice Lacroix and, we are convinced, our consumers.

3 brand ambassadors of Maurice Lacroix

 

SCHMOOZY FOX: Were there any specific profiles of people you were looking for? Did they have to belong to a specific field of knowledge, or profession?

Martin Bachmann: The most important factor for us was to identify strong personalities, people with charisma and a track of achievement throughout their lives. As far as backgrounds go, we looked for achievers in science, business, sport or entertainment. An important criterion was to identify unique personalities. Even in entertainment, we considered some individuals, but the originality of character was more important to us than the mainstream celebrity status. In this sense, Bob Geldof, who has had an amazing career as a musician, and who is a speaker on various issues from politics to entertainment, sought by corporations, fit the bill very well!

SCHMOOZY FOX: Besides brand endorsements, you also talk about partnerships on your website? What are they all about?

Martin Bachmann: You must have seen a series of interviews published in cooperation with Monocle magazine. For instance, we have interviewed Leo Liu, a wine-grower from China. We’ve also collaborated with various designers outside of the company who have brought in a fresh perspective on contemporary design and created some very successful watches for Maurice Lacroix. In this sense, Maurice Lacroix is always on the lookout for fresh ideas, and co-operation with inspirational people. All of them are unique in the sense that they have chosen to follow a very original path in their lives, for example, Leo Liu.

SCHMOOZY FOX: In this respect, this willingness for co-operation, partnerships and openness for fresh ideas is an important element of all funky brands!

Martin Bachmann: Yes, indeed! We also believe that this openness is a way to keep our company innovative. It also builds our team spirit immensely!

SCHMOOZY FOX: Is Maurice Lacroix all about men’s watches? I have  seen a couple of beautiful models for women, but the majority of your watches are for men. Is this why your brand endorsement campaign focusing primarily on male brand ambassadors?

Martin Bachmann: Indeed, men’s watches are our core product, although eventually we plan to have about 25% of our turnover come from women’s watches. This explains why currently we seek mainly male brand ambassadors. But I surely don’t exclude an opportunity to have a female brand ambassador in due time!

SCHMOOZY FOX: Finally, Maurice Lacroix is all about tradition and excellence of watch-making. Besides, your company also communicates about being contemporary. How do you manage to combine the two -- tradition and the spirit of modern times?

Martin Bachmann: Our watches are about tradition in the sense that they are all hand made according to industry standards in craftsmanship, some of which have not changed in centuries. But the design is where we want to show contemporary trends! Here we are far from the traditional. For instance, instead of  producing only traditional yellow and white gold watches, we often create watch cases with more modern materials, for instance titanium or steel that is treated with a ceramic coating or apply innovative decorations and color codes on our movements, like e.g. black gold.

PT Chronographe Rectangulaire Full Black_B

SCHMOOZY FOX: Many thanks, Martin, for sharing the brand spirit of Maurice Lacroix on the SCHMOOZY FOX blog, and I wish you the best of success further on!

Martin Bachmann: Thank you!

A new kind of brand ambassadors: famous entrepreneurs

Jimmy Wales WikipediaHere is a photo of a magazine back page that I took this morning. It made me think of a new trend that is emerging in the area of celebrity endorsements: business celebrities as brand ambassadors. Even if you are not familiar with the term, you've most probably come across brand celebrity endorsements on many occasions.  These are short or long-term partnerships between a brand and a real person, usually a celebrity from the world of music, sports or movies. If you've seen ads with Hollywood stars next to cars, perfume or other products, then you've seen a celebrity endorsement in action.

In such brand partnerships, celebrities serve as the so called meta-brands: overarching, superior concepts that add  positive associations to other brands wanting to relate to them. For celebrities, it's also important to choose the right brands to work with, because at the end of the day, they have to pinpoint these people's personal brands.

My observation that I want to share with you today is this: most brands, especially luxury products, like to work with celebrities from the world of entertainment and sports.

However, it seems like there's a whole new trend emerging out there: celebrities from the non-entertainment world. They are not as widely known as entertainment stars, but they nevertheless have a lot of qualities that brands can tap into and benefit from. This trend is not yet very well explored by brands, it seems.

A concrete example that I want to share with you today is the recent brand campaign by a Swiss watch brand Maurice Lacroix. In particular, its brand partnership with Jimmy Wales, an American Internet entrepreneur and co -founder of Wikipedia.

The two other brand ambassadors that Maurice Lacroix chose -- Bob Geldoff and Justin Rose -- come from the worlds of music and sports, respectively. But Jimmy Wales is a businessman whose name is known to a lesser extent.

What's known much better is his non-profit foundation: Wikipedia.

What did Maurice Lacroix want to communicate by selecting Bob Geldoff, Justin Rose and Jimmy Wales as its brand ambassadors? I guess, the most important qualities that seems to unite them all are continuity, staying on course, and staying true to themselves. And of course, achieving results.

As brands look for authenticity and natural, not-too-commercial, ways of connecting with their consumers, we're likely to see more entrepreneurs, journalists, and other people outside of the entertainment world with strong personal brands, endorse products and services.